About Siem Reap

Angkor Wat Siem Reap is located 314 kms north of the capital city Phnom Penh, one of the Cambodia's twenty-four provinces. Siem Reap covers an area of 10,299 square kms. Siem Reap is the 10th largest province in Cambodia. With a population of 896,309, it ranks as the 6th largest in the nation. Agriculture and tourism are the main resources of income of this province. Example: rice, cassava, palm sugar, cashew, mango, dragon fruit, fish and crafts. The province came under the control of the Thai kingdom of Siam in 1795 and was later returned to Cambodia in 1907 after French made a treaty with Siam for exchange of Trat and Dan Sai for the Siamese province of Inner Cambodia which included Phra Tabong (Battambang),Siemmarat (Siem Reap), and Nakhon Wat (Angkor Wat). The Inner Cambodia province was split into Battambang and Siem Reap by the royal decree of King Sisowath the same year. This area became part of a disputed territory between France and Siam (now Thailand) which led to the Franco-Thai War in 1941, resulting in victory for Thailand and a return to Thai control (with exception of Siem Reap and Angkor Wat). The province again reverted to Cambodia in 1946, after the end of World War II with French and UN international pressure. Thailand) which led to the Franco-Thai War in 1941, resulting in victory for Thailand and a return to Thai control (with exception of Siem Reap and Angkor Wat). The province again reverted to Cambodia in 1946, after th e end of World War II with French and UN international pressure.

About Shopping

Old Market, Siem Reap After visiting the temples for a couple of days, tourists might get temple overload and want to do something different. I would recommend you spend your afternoon visiting Old Market, Khmer calls Psa Chas, is the most popular shopping area, located at the heard of town. I can't even count how many shops there are at the moment. People can get varieties of goods such as fishes, dried fishes, beef jerkies, famous Khmer fish paste (Prahok) in just a few seconds because form one shop to others are within walking distance. It's not an easy place to negotiate in, so you must try one of the newer ones if you are seriously bargain hunting. There is also the Central Market which is always good for clothes and shoes and decent knock-off bags, but that's going to close soon. Clearly, when there are so many horrible markets opening up, it makes perfect sense to close one of the few good ones. But I mustn't whinge, it's not seemly. The original Angkor Night Market is by a mile the most pleasant. It's clean, well-ordered, friendly sellers and has two bars, including the Island Bar which should be checked out for its cocktails, as well as a recently opened food court which looks pretty good too.